"Biloxi," in which a son criticizes his father for abandoning the family, begins, "Where in hell did you go, " while "Mustang Burn," in which the singer addresses a man whose automobile he may or may not have torched, starts with, "I don't give a damn that your car's on fire." They tell stories that grab you right away, and they're good enough that you wish Ingram's songs were all that good and wonder why they're not.

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I wasn’t taking a break; I still played 100 plus shows every year.

I wrote two records during that time, “Midnight Motel” being the first.

For those who've never encountered Ingram and his band live, this document is as solid as it gets. Included are 15 tracks, most of which are Ingram standards such as his signature tune, "Beat Up Ford," "Red, White & Blues," "Nothing to Gain," "Ghost of a Man," "She Don't Love You," and "Run to Me," of course.

In addition, there are a few stellar covers included such as the Joe Maphis classic "Dim Lights, Thick Smoke (And Loud, Loud Music)" and a set-ending stunner in the form of Waylon Jennings' "Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way." Ingram's manner of relating to an audience has nothing to do with corny jokes, or self-styled anthems geared to get response from a drunken crowd.

I do realize that he probably falsified his age when he enlisted.

More details have become available on Ingram's military record since the Jones and Mc Clure book biography (details further down this webpage).

And what comes across here is the only thing that matters on any live recording, or any recording period: the transference of emotion from performer to listener, in spades.

Bouncing back from his first, abortive major-label experience with the shuttered Rising Tide imprint, Jack Ingram lands on another custom label, Sony's Lucky Dog, for his fifth album overall, Hey You.

“Midnight Motel” was a knee-jerk reaction to becoming a country star, winning awards and getting on the radio and all that.