People scored each other on a 1-to-10 scale and indicated whether or not s/he wanted to date the other.So a few things can happen: This also presented interesting dating styles.and not just on account of the state-of-the-art digital technology.

psychology of speed dating-20

On each date, people scored each other on attractiveness, intelligence, ambition, and some other things, along with a to seeing the other person again on a regular date. noted gender differences in mate selection, such as: “Women put greater weight on the intelligence and the race of partner, while men respond more to physical attractiveness.” And this: “Men do not value women’s intelligence or ambition when it exceeds their own.” Seemed like data worth checking out. The point of it all is to match every woman with every man for a short period of time so that by the end, every one has gotten a chance to quickly know each other.

In case you’re unfamiliar with the speed dating process, here’s how it works. The assumption is that you can learn a lot about a person in a short period of time.

He is also interested in exploring how close relationships research can inform evolutionary psychological approaches (and vice versa), especially with respect to the way that relationships grow and develop over time (see a brief description of the Re CAST model here).

Additionally, his work draws from anthropological data on the time course of human evolution to make novel psychological predictions.

Video: Speed-dating and the social relations model [Download Article] [OSF Data Files and Scripts]Finkel, E.

“Going Out” of the Box: Close intercultural relationships spark creativity, workplace innovation, and entrepreneurship. [Download Article] [OSF Preregistration]2016 Durante, K. Discussions led to the current project: A two-year speed-networking study.For Cohen, the project is satisfying as a study in social psychology- on how people choose their partners.Then, it was time to move on to the next pairing and eight more rounds of speed-networking. 23 gathering at the Social Science Research Commons in Woodburn Hall was the second of three speed-networking events organized by Meryl Bertenthal and her team at the Office of the Vice Provost for Research in collaboration with Professor Peter Todd and graduate student Samantha Cohen, both in the Department of Psychology and Brain Sciences.The events, funded by OVPR, are part of an ongoing study on the formation of academic partnerships and the best ways to ignite them.The study, which is published in the November 7 issue of the , is one of the first to look at what happens in the brain when people make rapid-judgment decisions that carry real social consequences, the researchers say."Psychologists have known for some time that people can often make very rapid judgments about others based on limited information, such as appearance," says John O'Doherty, professor of psychology and one of the paper's coauthors.