Microsoft Word has an automatic table of contents function that can automatically generate a table of contents for your document, provided you correctly tag the chapter headers and sub-headers that you wish to show in your table of contents.Setting this up can be a time-consuming process, but if you are writing a lengthy document that will go through several drafts, the automatic Table of Contents can save you a lot of manual revising each time your page numbers or chapter titles change.And just when you’re about to pat yourself on the back for having an automatic Table of Contents in your document, you notice something’s a little … First, we go to the References tab and find the Table of Contents menu on the far left: That brings us to the Table of Contents dialog box. which will take us to the Style dialog box: This dialog box lists all of the Styles associated with Table of Contents entries.

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This will both apply the "Heading 1" style to your chapter heading (allowing the Table of Contents to detect it), and also update the Heading 1 style for your document to match the style you were using.

Once the "Heading 1" style has been updated to match that in your document, for the other chapter headers, just highlight the chapter title and left-click on the (now-modified) "Heading 1" style to apply it.

Topics such as special pagination for the front matter or landscape pages and combining documents are also included.

Students, staff and faculty can get dissertation formatting assistance at Scholarspace: Located on the second floor of the Hatcher Graduate Library.

Next, on the "Home" tab on the menu, go to the Styles section and find the style "Heading 1" (but don't click it yet, because clicking it will reformat your title to Word's default "Heading 1" style format).

For your first chapter heading, right-click the style "Heading 1" and select "Update Heading 1 to Match Selection".

To meet Rackham’s Dissertation Formatting Guidelines – as well as any set by your school or department – you will need to modify the default, standard Word document.

This online guide is intended to show you how to use the tools to make the necessary modifications.

Here’s where we can fix everything that’s wrong with the second-level TOC entries: we can change the font from Arial to Times New Roman with the drop-down in the center, and we can fix the paragraph issues (the right indentation and the amount of vertical space before and after) by clicking on the Format button at the bottom and choosing “Paragraph” from the menu.