The woman was shocked when she received two nude photos of herself by e-mail.

The photos had been taken over a period of several months — without her knowledge — by the built-in camera on her laptop.

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The same year, a Wyoming couple sued the national rent-to-own chain Aaron's after the company used the webcam on a rented computer to spy on the couple.

The couple's final payment on the computer hadn't been recorded, and a repossession man who showed up at their house to seize the computer provided the webcam photo as evidence that the couple still had it.

The documents show the legal status of the system was discussed, particularly in relation to using automated facial matching to identify the people in the pictures.

“It was agreed that the legalities of such a capability would be considered once it had been developed, but that the general principle applied would be that if the accuracy of the algorithm was such that it was useful to the analyst,” one document from 2008 reads.

Her little sister, Suzy, was doing the same thing down the hall.

The house was quiet, save the keyboard tapping in the girls' rooms, when the odd little instant message popped up on Melissa's screen—an IM from Suzy.

FBI Director James Comey recently said that everyone should put opaque tape over their computer webcams to protect their privacy.

That sounds terribly simplistic, but Comey is right.

Every online scam begins more or less the same—a random e-mail, a sketchy attachment.

But every so often, a new type of hacker comes along. He secretly burrows his way into your hard drive, then into your life. It was a Saturday night, not much happening in her Long Beach, California, neighborhood, so high school senior Melissa Young was home messing around on her computer.

Fortunately, the FBI was able to identify a suspect: her high school classmate, a man named Jared Abrahams. W., later identified herself on Twitter as Miss Teen USA Cassidy Wolf.